View Gallery

Higher Education in Portuguese Speaking African Countries

Published Date: October 10, 2014

Available in

R150.00

Description

As the evidence from this study shows, Africa, in particular sub-Saharan Africa, comprises some of the poorest nations in the world and therefore desperately needs strong higher education systems that can assist in its rapid development. It is widely acknowledged that higher education plays a key role in the economic, scientific, social and human development of any country, and that the economically strongest nations are those with the best performing higher education sectors. Higher education, as the producer of knowledge and knowledge workers, is assuming an even more important role with the realisation that knowledge, not natural resources, is the key to Africa’s sustainable development. – Alice Sena Lamptey, ADEA

 

CONTENTS

Tables vi

Figures vii

Acknowledgements viii

Acronyms and abbreviations ix

Preface xi

Executive summary and structure xiii

 

 

Chapter one:Introduction and background 1

1.1 Introduction 1

1.2 Objectives of the study 2

1.3 Methodology of the study 2

 

 

Chapter two:Angola 5

2.1 Country profile 5

2.2 Background and historical context of higher education 6

2.3 Trends of expansion, diversification and differentiation 7

2.3.1 Institutions and programmes 8

2.3.2 The establishment of Agostinho Neto University (ANU) 9

2.3.3 The emergence of private universities 9

2.4 Changes in higher education governance 11

2.4.1 Changing governance contexts 11

2.4.2 Quality assurance 13

2.5 Financing higher education 14

2.5.1 Sources of funding and expenditure on higher education 15

2.5.2 Tuition fees, cost-sharing 16

2.6 Access and equity 17

2.7 ICT in higher education 18

2.7.1 ICT policy development 18

References 20

 

 

Chapter three:Cape Verde 23

3.1 Country profile 23

3.2 Background and historical context of higher education 24

3.3 Trends of expansion, diversification and differentiation 25

3.4 Changes in higher education governance 37

3.5 Financing higher education 38

3.5.1 Tuitions fees and cost-sharing 39

3.5.2 Shifting from international to local scholarships 39

3.6 Quality assurance 41

3.7 ICT in higher education 42

References 43

 

 

Chapter four:Guinea-Bissau 45

4.1 Country profile 45

4.2 Background and historical context of higher education 46

4.2.1 The development of post-secondary education 47

4.2.2 The birth of university education: Faculties of Medicine and Law 48

4.3 Trends of expansion, diversification and differentiation 50

4.3.1 Emergence of private higher education 51

4.3.2 The rise of a new higher education landscape 52

4.4 Amílcar Cabral University: A dream deferred 53

4.5 The governance of higher education 55

4.5.1 An unregulated system? Quality assurance 55

4.5.2 Financing and access in higher education 56

4.6 ICT in higher education 57

References 59

 

 

Chapter five:Mozambique 61

5.1 Country profile 61

5.2 The genesis of higher education 62

5.2.1 Colonial period 62

5.2.2 Independence and socialist period 63

5.2.3 Multi-party democracy and free-market period 64

5.3 Trends of expansion, diversification and differentiation 65

5.3.1 Expansion of higher education institutions 65

5.3.2 Classification and differentiation of higher education institutions 66

5.3.3 Academic programmes offered in different higher education institutions 69

5.3.4 Expansion in student enrolment 77

5.3.5 Projected scenarios of growth in student enrolment 2012–2005 78

5.4 Changes in higher education governance 79

5.5 Financing higher education 81

5.6 ICT in higher education 82

5.6.1 Second-generation providers 83

5.6.2 Variables affecting ICT-enabled education 84

References 85

 

 

Chapter six: São Tomé and Príncipe 87

6.1 Country background 87

6.2 Background and historical context of higher education 88

6.3 Trends of expansion, diversity and differentiation 88

6.3.1 Students in the higher education system 89

6.3.2 Academic programmes 90

6.3.3 Academic degrees and diplomas 90

6.4 Changes in higher education governance 91

6.5 Financing higher education 91

6.6 ICT in higher education 92

References 93

 

 

Chapter seven: Conclusion 95

 

 

Appendix 1: Building a higher education research network and

advocacy for PALOP: HERANA–PALOP

1. Introduction 99

2. Bringing PALOP into HERANA 100

2.1 About HERANA 100

3. Masters programme in higher education 101

3.1 Developing an academic exchange programme 101

4. Association of Portuguese Speaking Universities (AULP) 102

5. Revista Inter-universitária–PALOP (RIU–PALOP) 102

 

 

Appendix 2: Interviews 103

 

 

About the author 104

Reviews

Leave a Reply