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Going to University: The Influence of Higher Education on the Lives of Young South Africans

Student Politics in Africa: Representation and Activism

The second volume of the African Higher Education Dynamics Series brings together the research of an international network of higher education scholars with interest in higher education and student politics in Africa. Most authors are early career academics who teach and conduct research in universities across the continent and came together for a research project, and related workshops and a symposium on student representation in African higher education governance.

The book includes theoretical chapters on student organising, student activism and representation; chapters on historical and current developments in student politics in Anglophone and Francophone Africa, and in-depth case studies on student representation and activism in a cross-section of universities and countries.

The book provides a unique resource for academics, university leaders and student affairs professionals as well as student leaders and policy-makers in Africa and elsewhere.

Knowledge Production and Contradictory Functions in African Higher Education

Table of Contents

List of tables, figures and appendix tables | Acronyms and abbreviations | Acknowledgements |

Foreword

Roles of Universities and the African Context  Nico Cloete and Peter Maassen
Research Universities in Africa: An empirical overview of eight flagship universities  Nico Cloete, Ian Bunting and Peter Maassen
Assessing the Performance of African Flagship Universities  Ian Bunting, Nico Cloete, Henri Li Kam Wah and Florence Nakayiwa-Mayega
Research Output and International Research Cooperation in African Flagship Universities  Robert Tijssen
South Africa as a PhD Hub in Africa?  Nico Cloete, Charles Sheppard and Tracy Bailey

Faculty Perceptions of the Factors that Influence Research Productivity read more

Public Broadcasting in Africa Series: Zimbabwe

This report is the result of research that started in 2008 with the aim of collecting, collating and writing up information about regulation, ownership, access, performance as well as prospects for public broadcasting reform in Africa. The Zimbabwe report is part of an 11-country survey of African broadcast media, evaluating compliance with the agreements, conventions, charters and declarations regarding media that have been developed at regional and continental levels in Africa.

Public Broadcasting in Africa Series: Nigeria

This report on the broadcast media in Nigeria finds that liberalisation efforts in the broadcasting sector have only been partially achieved. More than a decade after military rule, the nation still has not managed to enact media legislation that is in line with continental standards, particularly the Declaration on Freedom of Expression in Africa. The report, part of an 11-country survey of broadcast media in Africa, strongly recommends the transformation of the two state broadcasters into a genuine public broadcaster as an independent legal entity with editorial independence and strong safeguards against any interference from the federal government, state governments and other interests.

Public Broadcasting in Africa Series: Uganda

Uganda's broadcast media landscape has witnessed tremendous growth in recent years. While the public broadcaster remains the dominant national player - in terms of reach - in both radio and television, commercial broadcasters have introduced a substantial level of diversity in the industry. Public broadcasting faces serious competition from the numerous private and independent broadcasters, especially in and around the capital Kampala and major urban centres. In fact, the private/commercial sector clearly dominates the industry in most respects, notably productivity and profitability. The public broadcaster, which enjoys wider geographical coverage, faces the challenge of trying to fulfill a broad mandate with little funding. This makes it difficult for UBC to compete with the more nimble operators in the commercial/private sector. Overall, there appears to be a healthy degree of pluralism and diversity in terms of ownership.