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Linking Higher Education and Economic Development

Finland, South Korea and the state of North Carolina in the United States are three systems that successfully have harnessed higher education in their economic development initiatives. Common to the success of the all these systems is, amongst others, the link between economic and education planning, quality public schooling, high tertiary participation rates with institutional differentiation, labour market demand, cooperation and networks, and consensus about the importance of higher education for development.

Linking higher education and economic development: Implications for Africa from three successful systems draws together evidence on the three systems, synthesises the key findings, and distils the implications for African countries.

The University in Africa and Democratic Citizenship: Hothouse or Training Ground?

Whether and how higher education in Africa contributes to democratisation beyond producing the professionals that are necessary for developing and sustaining a modern political system, remains an unresolved question. This report, then, represents an attempt to address the question of whether there are university-specific mechanisms or pathways by which higher education contributes to the development of democratic attitudes and behaviours among students, and how these mechanisms operate and relate to politics both on and off campus.

The research shows that the potential of a university to act as training ground for democratic citizenship is best realised by supporting students' exercise of democratic leadership on campus. This, in turn, develops and fosters democratic leadership in civil society. Thus, the university's response to student political activity, student representation in university governance and other aspects of extra-curricular student life needs to be examined for ways in which African universities can instil and support democratic values and practices. Encouraging and facilitating student leadership in various forms of on-campus political activity and in a range of student organisations emerges as one of the most promising ways in which African universities can act as training grounds for democratic citizenship.

Dick Fehnel: Lessons from Graver’s School

Dick Fehnel worked as higher education consultant for World Bank, Ford Foundation and the Human Sciences Research Council. He held the positions of acting representative (1998–1999) and programme officer (1993–2000) for the Ford Foundation, Southern Africa, after which he semi-retired to Portland Oregon, and continued to travel and consult until his death in May 2006.

Some Developments in Research in Science and Mathematics in Sub-Saharan Africa

Much attention in late-developing countries is given to providing access to studies which allow school leavers to enter science and technology-related careers. These programmes are driven by the belief that graduates will then substantially contribute to the developmental needs of their countries.

But is providing access to institutions enough? Students in developing countries often come from school environments
lacking in resources – human, physical and financial. This book, in a number of chapters, reviews research related to the crucial dimension of epistemological access to the disciplines of import, which students need as much as institutional access in order to improve their chances of success.

Responding to the Educational Needs of Post-School Youth

Books a la Carte are unbound, three hole punch versions of the textbook. This lower cost option is easy to transport and comes with same access code or media that would be packaged with the bound book.
This no. 1 selling non majors microbiology textbook is praised for its straightforward presentation of complex topics, careful balance of concepts and applications, and proven art that teaches. In its Tenth Edition, Tortora Funke Case responds to the no. 1 challenge of the microbiology course: teaching a wide range of student levels, while still addressing student under preparedness. The Tenth Edition meets students at their respective skill levels.

Higher Education Financing in East and Southern Africa

This nine-country study of higher education financing in Africa includes three East African states (Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda), five countries in southern Africa (Botswana, Lesotho, Mozambique, Namibia and South Africa), and an Indian Ocean island state (Mauritius). Higher Education Financing in East and Southern Africa explores trends in financing policies, paying particular attention to the nature and extent of public sector funding of higher education, the growth of private financing (including both household financing and the growth of private higher education institutions) and the changing mix of financing instruments that these countries are developing in response to public sector financial constraints. This unique collection of African-country case studies draws attention to the remaining challenges around the financing of higher education in Africa, but also identifies good practices, lessons and common themes.