GRID VIEW LIST VIEW

Focus on Fresh Data on the Language of Instruction in Tanzania and South Africa

This is a series of books from the LOITASA (Language of Instruction in Tanzania and South Africa) project. LOITASA is a NUFU-funded (Norwegian University Fund) project which began in January 2002 and continued till the end of 2006. It is, what in donor circles is known as a ‘South-South-North’ cooperation project which, in this case, involves research cooperation between South Africa, Tanzania and Norway. The first book, entitled Language of instruction in Tanzania and South Africa (LOITASA), focused on the current language in education situation in the two countries by providing a description and analysis of existing language policies and practices

Researching the language of instruction in Tanzania and South Africa

This book is the second in a series of books from the LOITSASA (Language of Instruction in Tanzania and South Africa) project and reflects the work done in the second year of the project. LOITSASA is a NUFU-funded (Norwegian University Fund) project which began in January 2002 and continued till the end of 2006. It is, what in donor circles is known as a 'South-South-North' cooperation project which in this case, involves research cooperation between South Africa, Tanzania and Norway. The first book, entitled Language of instruction in Tanzania and South Africa (LOITSASA), focused on the current language in education situation in two countries by providing a description and analysis of existing language policies and practices. This book has as its main focus a discussion of research projects in the two countries focusing on the language of instruction issue. All the chapters in the book were presented at the second LOITSASA Workshop held at the University of the Western Cape in April 2003.

Shaping the Future of South Africa’s Youth: Rethinking Post-School Education and Skills Training

Across nine evidence-based chapters, 17 authors offer a succinct overview of the different facets of post-school provision in South Africa. These include an analysis of the impact of the national qualifications system on occupational training, the impact of youth unemployment, the capacity of the post-school system to absorb larger numbers of young people, the relationship between universities and FET colleges, the need for more strategic public and private investment in skills development, and a youth perspective on education and training policy. The authors have a number of recommendations for improving the alignment between schooling, further education and training, and university education – interventions that could shape the future of South Africa’s youth.